Cemetery

Wilson Cemetery

Wilson Cemetery occupies many acres of ground at the four way intersection of Graniteville Road, Websterville Road, and Sterling Hill Road, occupying the northeast corner. The cemetery, over 200 years old, shows its age as well as its current and more modern layout style across the grounds. Stately old maple trees decorate the site, new hedges and ornamental bushes outline some of the newest areas of the cemetery. The oldest stone in the cemetery comes from 1798. Wilson is an expanding cemetery, still in use, with the potential for growth well into the future. The very oldest sections are not used in current cemetery operations, nor are lots sold in the older areas. Old Yard (OY) 3 and OY4 hold some of Barre Town’s, which was then called Wildersburg, earliest residents. Several Revolutionary War and War of 1812 veterans have been laid to rest in these sections. By strolling though the existing monuments, evidence can be found linking many of the early families together through marriage. Some of these families can be found at rest next to each other.

Wilson Cemetery is the home of some of Barre’s earliest and most significant citizens. Colonel Benjamin Walker not only fought in the Revolution, he served as the first Justice of the Peace and also in the state general assembly. Major Nathan Harrington became the first town representative as well as serving in other town offices. Warren Ellis, a saddler, became a judge, town clerk, and representative. He had a reputation as a great musician and music teacher. Deacon Jonas Nichols, among the first to settle Barre, lived to age 96. Captain Joseph Watson, a business man, offered the town tanning and shoemaking services.

The alpha sections, A, B, C, D, E, F, and G, migrated westerly from the old yards. Section F can also be found in the cards as the Main section. (One of the old maps showed the area south of Section A, towards the Websterville Road, as a pauper’s row.) Burials are still performed in some of these alpha sections, Section G being the most active. Wilson’s vault, storage for caskets of those who passed during the winter months, sits at the west end of Sections B and C. Many cemeteries, including those in Barre Town, do not perform burials in the winter months when the frost is in the ground, the vault providing a safe and dry repository for those awaiting interment.

The commissioners have added an area for columbaria used to store the ashes of those departed available below.
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Wilson Cemetery Schematics

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History of Wilson Cemetery

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